Tag Archives: nine muse press

Edgar Wilde and the Lost Grimoire

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Photos courtesy of http://www.paulramey.me

(Excerpt from book:)

“’As you see on that elegant tombstone over there, Margharet Fullman passed away on April 23, 1724.  She was only nineteen when she left this world.’

“The tall figure paused, letting the drama of it take root.  ‘Now you’ll remember,’ he pointed this flashlight back down the path ‘one Hadley Williamson, twenty-three years old, who passed away on the very same day as Margharet.  There is no documentation as of the circumstances of either’s demise.’

“Satisfied murmurs among his tour group let Edgar Wilde know he had them in the palm of his hand.  He loved a captive audience.

“‘Given the date, it could possibly be nothing more than simple, tragic coincidence- yellow fever, perhaps.  However, some have claimed that they were actually found by Margharet’s father- a certain Barnes Fullman- the night before their deaths, caught in a very passionate embrace.  Mr. Fullman was clearly a very important man in this town, yet to this day his existence is denied.  In fact, the name Barnes Fullman isn’t found in any of the official historical documents of this town.  Not even a tombstone to remember him by.’”

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A precocious 15-year-old, Edgar Wilde knows he’s considered a freak by classmates, but it doesn’t bother him.  He’s already earning money by giving cemetery tours, and has a deep love of history and old books.  Edgar knows a good mystery when he sees one, and he knows something more exists to the Barnes Fullman legend than anybody in the Historical Society will admit.

edgar wilde

A first novel for both author Paul Ramey and his publisher Nine Muse Press, Edgar Wilde and the Lost Grimoire rolls them, full speed, into the fiction world.  Starting out with fast-paced intrigue, it doesn’t let go of the mystery.  Even at the very end, a little intrigue remains.

I bought this book a few days after it became available to the public, and started it a few weeks later.  Though details of my life interfered with the nonstop reading I would have loved, I still didn’t lose the story for the interruptions.  Narration and setting were succinct enough to plant them in my mind, and characters drew me in.  When I took the book up again, I jumped right back into Edgar Wilde’s world.

The characters are well done.  Edgar is so believable that I laughed out loud when he shied away from Sarah the Barista’s overt flirtation.  He acts like a nerdy 15-year-old boy would act, and Shelby is successfully portrayed as a not-yet-tainted teenage girl.  I can easily imagine Cora and Gertrude clucking like old hens over cups of coffee, and I’d love to have both Felicia and Aubry as aunts.  Corinthian would be a great friend, up until he put me on a rack.

So what’s the basic rundown of this book?

Rating: PG-13.  I sigh whenever I mark a book down because of a scattering of foul language or a short sexual scene.  But as I know many of my friends would want to be warned about even a single curse word, I also know they’re part of a large group of readers.  Though Edgar Wilde is appropriate in every other way for young teens, a bullying character drops a couple of F-bombs early on in the book.  They’re in context; they’re from an antagonist; the character gets chided for uttering them.  But they’re there.

Last year, a friend called me up seeking advice on two documentaries the school wanted to show her 6th grader.  She had to sign a permission form.  One was rated PG, the other PG-13.  I had seen both movies on several occasions, so I knew exactly why the one got the PG-13 label… somebody dropped a single F-bomb.  Children hear it all the time on the playground, repeat it to their friends, and hide it from their moms.  But, as widespread and commonplace as it may be, it still turns many readers away.

Would I recommend this book to my own children, ages 11 and 13?  Yes.  With warnings about the few cuss words.

Credibility rating: 99%.  As a mystery story, some truth has to be stretched.  I loved how Mr. Ramey delved into the superstitions and prejudice of colonial New England for his stories.  It already lends intrigue, and sets up many stories for the possibilities of mass hysteria among a fearful people.  Only one part of this book felt out of place, though.  (Spoiler Alert!)  At the end, where Corinthian took Shelby to the rack, it felt forced.  Edgar followed them down into the chamber, and boom!  She was on the rack.  That fast.  Also, this move seemed out of place for a man who had shown no other hints of sadism during the entire book.  That said… it’s the only part I can argue with.

Satisfaction rating: Yes, please.  From beginning to end, Edgar Wilde read smoothly and satisfied me.  But now I wonder… will we be seeing more of Edgar from Paul Ramey and NMP?

I invite Mr. Ramey to answer that for us, if he has a moment.

Want to read the book?  Here’s the link through Amazon!  If you have another e-reader other than Kindle, buy through Nine Muse Press itself.

If you go through Nine Muse Press’ link, you can download a sample chapter.

And be sure to check out Paul Ramey’s blog.

Next up?  Dead Sea Games: Adrift by J. Whitworth Hazzard

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The Circle of Books

Lately, I’ve come across a very beautiful thing. An author’s support ring. While seeking advice from other published authors charitable with advice, I learned something valuable: you get what you give. What goes around comes around. Pretty general cliché stuff, right? Nope, just a little truth that rings out in many settings.

You see, as indie authors quickly learn, putting your words into publication has become the easier part of the process. With enough money, the right software, the right publisher… you can successfully publish absolute drivel. Or a riveting, earth-shaking novel. Either way, nobody is going to even know you’re published unless you get your name out there. Even more… nobody is even going to care.

You need people to support you, who want to see you succeed. People who think you’re cool enough to recommend to others. People who will share around your Amazon link. People who can tell you where you’re messing up, and the best way to fix the problem so you can move on to greatness.

If I intended to publish for a group of 20 friends, I don’t need to go any further. If I intend to push my work out there, to test my limits, to learn and grow and play in the ranks of the many good authors out there, I need to do a little more work.

My author ring grows. It’s a warm, comfortable, welcoming place to be. They read my blog, and they respond. They offer valuable advice. They recommend books to read and review, which helps out either them or another in their ring. In addition to helping them, I’ve been highly entertained by some very worthy fiction.

And just today, Anna Meade from my author ring opened up Nine Muse Press, with that same intent.

It goes deeper, though…

Nine Muse Press also publishes!

This is where I clasp my hands in earnest anticipation… hope… daydreams… and admit I still have a lot of work to do. A lot of networking. A lot of giving before karma cycles about my way.

So far, Nine Muse Press has published one book, Edgar Wilde and the Lost Grimoire.

edgar wilde

Soon to come: Orison by Daniel Swensen. Hey… that book sounds familiar!

Orison

Is there any hands-clasping hope that NMP will publish Minstrel, or Heroes, or Legacy? I’m sure every other author in Ms. Meade’s author’s ring asked himself or herself the same question today, regarding their work.

I’m up for the challenge. Bring it on! Give me the books to read and review, the friendships to cultivate. Give me the constructive criticism I need to become greater. Someday, I’ll have paid my dues and will be ready for karma to come back my way.

Do you want to help out a newly published author? Visit NMP’s books page and download Edgar Wilde… it’s not expensive at all! I’m downloading it tonight.